Archbishop Sheen’s Beatification Miracle

 

Archbishop Sheen’s Beatification Miracle    August 1, 2019

Bonnie Engstrom asked for help from Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen as she watched lifesaving measures being taken for her son, who had been born at home just moments before without a pulse or drawing breath.

After 61 minutes, just as emergency room personnel were about to pronounce him dead, he began to breathe and his heart rate shot up to a normal level for a newborn. Despite a dire prognosis for his future, the boy has thrived and is now a healthy 8-year-old who likes chicken nuggets, Star Wars and riding his bicycle.

On July 5, Pope Francis formally approved this as a miracle attributed to the intercession of American Archbishop Sheen. (May 8, 1895 – December 9, 1979).

Bonnie Engstrom said that she had a “beautifully easy” pregnancy and that both she and her baby had been healthy. As they prepared to welcome her baby into their family, Bonnie said, “I started asking, basically on a daily basis, for Fulton Sheen’s prayers, for his intercession in the life of my child and in our marriage — to walk with us and to walk with my son, that he would be a lifelong Catholic who would love God and love his faith, that he would be a man of integrity. I was asking him to intercede every day while I was pregnant.”

Bonnie said that she and her husband Travis had been “watching YouTube videos of Bishop Sheen preaching. We were so impressed — he’s funny, he’s smart, and he’s just so approachable and warm. We were just so engaged with him.”

In the 1950s, Archbishop Fulton Sheen was a world-famous television pioneer who hosted his own show, Life Is Worth Living. The Engstroms knew that his cause for canonization as a saint was being sponsored by the Diocese of Peoria where they lived, so they decided that if their unborn child was a boy, they would name him James Fulton in honor of the Archbishop.

During Bonnie’s labor, a rare true knot formed in James Fulton’s umbilical cord and tightened. He was born blue and lifeless on September 16, 2010.

Bonnie said, “I remember sitting on my bedroom floor and watching them do CPR and in my head repeating over and over and over again, ‘Fulton Sheen, Fulton Sheen, Fulton Sheen, Fulton Sheen.’ I really think it was the Holy Spirit giving me the words I needed to say in that moment, because I had no words.” She said that it was the most natural thing in the world to turn to him again and ask him to pray for her son. The medical personnel determined that he couldn’t be revived. However, after 61 minutes, his little heart started to beat.

The Engstroms were told James Fulton would probably be blind and never walk, talk or be able to feed himself. However, in the days and weeks that followed he defied them all and continued to make progress.

In September 2011, the Diocese of Peoria initiated an investigation into the events of James Fulton’s recovery. They heard testimony from family members, first responders, doctors, nurses and others present at his birth. Each testified that there was no medical explanation for the infant’s recovery. Seven medical experts advising the Vatican Congregation unanimously approved the miracle.

This miracle has paved the way for Archbishop Sheen’s beatification ceremony in the near future. He needs one more approved miracle attributed to his intercession for his canonization as a saint.

 

FIAT!

 

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.bookofheaven.net/2019/08/02/archbishop-sheens-beatification-miracle/

Indulgence of Portiuncula Aug 2

 PORTIUNCULA INDULGENCE – FROM VESPERS AUGUST 1ST TO SUNDOWN ON AUGUST 2nd!!!

The Feast of Portiuncula!

A plenary indulgence is available to anyone who will:

1. Receive sacramental confession (8 days before of after)

2. Receive the Holy Eucharist at Holy Mass on August 2nd

3. Enter a parish church and, with a contrite heart, pray the Our Father, Apostles Creed, and a pray of his/her own choosing for the intentions of the Pope.

THE BASILICA OF
OUR LADY OF THE ANGELS

Shrine of the Portiuncula

The Portiuncula is situated now inside the
Basilica of Saint Mary of the Angels
in the town of the same name around 5 km from Assisi

Pope Emeritis Benedict XVI praying at the Shrine of Portiuncula

The chapel was of antique construction and venerated for the apparition of Angels within it.  In the chapel in 1216, in a vision, St Francis obtained from Jesus himself the Indulgence of the Pardon of Assisi that was approved by Pope Honorius III.

FIAT!

Permanent link to this article: https://www.bookofheaven.net/2019/08/01/indulgence-of-portiuncula-aug-1-2/

God the Father Novena begins today Jul 28th

God the Father

Full Novena can be found here

Permanent link to this article: https://www.bookofheaven.net/2019/07/28/god-the-father-novena-begins-today-jul-30th/

Feast of Saint Benedict July 11

Feast of Saint Benedict 


St. Benedict is believed to have been born around 480, as the son to a Roman noble of Norcia and the twin to his sister, Scholastica.

In the fifth century, the young Benedict was sent to Rome to finish his education with a nurse/housekeeper. The subject that dominated a young man’s study then was rhetoric — the art of persuasive speaking. A successful speaker was not one who had the best argument or conveyed the truth, but one who used rhythm, eloquence, and technique to convince. The power of the voice without foundation in the heart was the goal of the student’s education. And that philosophy was reflected in the lives of the students as well. They had everything — education, wealth, youth — and they spent all of it in the pursuit of pleasure, not truth. Benedict watched in horror as vice unraveled the lives and ethics of his companions.

Afraid for his soul, Benedict fled Rome, gave up his inheritance and lived in a small village with his nurse. When God called him beyond this quiet life to an even deeper solitude, he went to the mountains of Subiaco. Although becoming a hermit was not his purpose in leaving, there he lived as a hermit under the direction of another hermit, Romanus.

One day, during his time living in a cave above a lake as a hermit, the Devil presented Benedict’s imagination with a beautiful, tempting woman. Benedict resisted by rolling his body into a thorn bush until it was covered in scrapes. It is said through these body wounds, he cured the wounds of his soul.

After years of prayer, word of his holiness brought nearby monks to ask for his leadership. He warned them he would be too strict for them, but they insisted — then tried to poison him when his warning proved true. The story goes, the monks attempted to poison Benedict’s drink, but when he prayed a blessing over the cup – it shattered.

So Benedict was on his own again — but not for long. The next set of followers were more sincere and he set up twelve monasteries in Subiaco where monks lived in separate communities of twelve.

He left these monasteries abruptly when the envious attacks of another hermit made it impossible to continue the spiritual leadership he had taken.

But it was in Monte Cassino he founded the monastery that became the roots of the Church’s monastic system. Instead of founding small separate communities he gathered his disciples into one whole community. His own sister, Saint Scholastica, settled nearby to live a religious life.

After almost 1,500 years of monastic tradition his direction seems obvious to us. However, Benedict was an innovator. No one had ever set up communities like his before or directed them with a rule. What is part of history to us now was a bold, risky step into the future.

Benedict had the holiness and the ability to take this step. His beliefs and instructions on religious life were collected in what is now known as the Rule of Saint Benedict — still directing religious life after 15 centuries.

In this tiny but powerful Rule, Benedict put what he had learned about the power of speaking and oratorical rhythms at the service of the Gospel. He did not drop out of school because he did not understand the subject! Scholars have told us that his Rule reflects an understanding of and skill with the rhetorical rules of the time. Despite his experience at school, he understood rhetoric was as much a tool as a hammer was. A hammer could be used to build a house or hit someone over the head. Rhetoric could be used to promote vice … or promote God. Benedict did not shun rhetoric because it had been used to seduce people to vice; he reformed it.

Benedict did not want to lose the power of voice to reach up to God simply because others had use it to sink down to the gutter. He reminded us “Let us consider our place in sight of God and of his angels. Let us rise in chanting that our hearts and voices harmonize.” There was always a voice reading aloud in his communities at meals, to receive guests, to educate novices. Hearing words one time was not enough — “We wish this Rule to be read frequently to the community.”

Benedict realized the strongest and truest foundation for the power of words was the Word of God itself: “For what page or word of the Bible is not a perfect rule for temporal life?” He had experienced the power of God’s word as expressed in Scripture: “For just as from the heavens the rain and snow come down and do not return there till they have watered the earth, making it fertile and fruitful, giving seed to him who sows and bread to him who eats, so shall my word be that goes forth from my mouth; It shall not return to me void, but shall do my will, achieving the end for which I sent it” (Isaiah 55:10-11).

For prayer, Benedict turned to the psalms, the very songs and poems from the Jewish liturgy that Jesus himself had prayed. To join our voices with Jesus in praise of God during the day was so important that Benedict called it the “Work of God.” And nothing was to be put before the work of God. “Immediately upon hearing the signal for the Divine Office all work will cease.” Benedict believed with Jesus that “One does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes forth from the mouth of God’ ” (Matthew 4:4).

But it wasn’t enough to just speak the words. Benedict instructed his followers to practice sacred reading — the study of the very Scriptures they would be praying in the Work of God. In this lectio divina, he and his monks memorized the Scripture, studied it, and contemplated it until it became part of their being. Four to six hours were set aside each day for this sacred reading. If monks had free time it “should be used by the brothers to practice psalms.” Lessons from Scripture were to be spoken from memory not read from a book. On Benedict’s list of “Instruments of Good Works” is “to enjoy holy readings.”

In one story of Benedict’s life, a poor man came to the monastery begging for a little oil. Although Benedict commanded that the oil be given, the cellarer refused — because there was only a tiny bit of oil left. If the cellarer gave any oil as alms there would be none for the monastery. Angry at this distrust of God’s providence, Benedict knelt down to pray. As he prayed a bubbling sound came from inside the oil jar. The monks watched in fascination as oil from God filled the vessel so completely that it overflowed, leaked out beneath the lid and finally pushed the cover off, cascading out on to the floor.

In Benedictine prayer, our hearts are the vessel empty of thoughts and intellectual striving. All that remains is the trust in God’s providence to fill us. Emptying ourselves this way brings God’s abundant goodness bubbling up in our hearts, first with an inspiration or two, and finally overflowing our heart with contemplative love.

Benedict died on 21 March 543, not long after his sister. It is said he died with high fever on the very day God told him he would. He is the patron saint of Europe and students.

Permanent link to this article: https://www.bookofheaven.net/2019/07/11/feast-of-saint-benedict-july-11/

Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Sacred Heart of Jesus HAVE MERCY ON US

THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS IN THE DIVINE WILL

FIAT!

Permanent link to this article: https://www.bookofheaven.net/2019/06/28/feast-of-the-sacred-heart-of-jesus/

Novena to the Immaculate Heart of Mary June 21 – 29

The Immaculate Heart of Mary in the Divine Will

Permanent link to this article: https://www.bookofheaven.net/2019/06/22/novena-to-the-immaculate-heart-of-mary-june-21-29/

Feast Day of St. Aloysius Gonzaga June 21

Saint Aloysius Gonzaga

Patron of the Divine Will
and
The Servant of God Luisa Piccarreta’s namesake.

The Servant of God Luisa Piccarreta, the Little Daughter of the Divine Will,  baptismal name was after St. Aloysius (St. Luis).  “Luisa” means “mighty in warfare.”  

 Luisa was born on April 23rd, the Feast of St. George the Martyr, in the province of Apulia, which is located on the heel of the Italian “boot”—which points to Jerusalem. In Genesis 3:15 God promised to crush the serpent’s head. In 1868, within 3 years after Luisa’s birth, the Church of the “Pater Noster” in Jerusalem was rebuilt for the third time, recalling the only prayer taught by Jesus: “Thy Kingdom come, Thy Will be done on earth as It is in Heaven.” 

 Luisa was born and died in the Diocese of Trani-Nazareth, in the town of Corato, whose name in its original Latin, cor datum, means “a heart given.”  This recalls the words of the Prophet Ezekiel:

 “A new heart I will give you, and a new spirit I will put within you; and I will take out of your flesh the heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh.  And I will put my spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes and be careful to observe my ordinances.  You shall dwell in the land which I gave your fathers; and you shall be my people, and I will be your God.  (Ezekiel 36:27-28)

 The Feast day of St. Aloysius, June 21st, was the same day of the release of the Baltimore Catechism.

St. Aloysius GonzagaFeast Day June 21st.  He is known for his purity and the performance of great austerities and religious practices.  St. Aloysius joined the Jesuits in Rome in 1585.  He has been declared Protector of young students and Patron of Catholic Youth.

St. Aloysius Gonzaga is known for his purity and the performance of great austerities and religious practices. Aloysius is the Latin form of Gonzaga’s given name, Luigi. In English, the equivalent form would be Louis. The Gonzaga name is well known in Italy. Aloysius Gonzaga was born at Castiglione near Mantua, Italy, in 1568 to a celebrated family of wealth and prestige. As the first born son of his father, Ferrante, and his mother, Marta, he was in line to inherit his father’s title of Marquis. He grew up amid the violence and brutality of the Renaissance Italy and witnessed the murder of two of his brothers. In 1576, Aloysius’ parents sent him to attend the court of the Grand Duke of Tuscany, Francesco de’Medici, in Florence. Later, accompanied by his parents, he traveled to Spain to join the court of Philip II in Madrid.

In Spain, Aloysius decided he wanted to join the newly founded religious order, The Society of Jesus. His father resisted his decision and there followed a struggle of wills that continued after his return to Castiglione in 1584. But Aloysius eventually prevailed. Renouncing his right to the title of Marquis and to the vast wealth he was destined to inherit, he entered the Society of Jesus in Rome on November 25, 1585. During his early studies in Rome, he would regularly go out into the streets of the city to care for victims of the plague. He himself contracted the disease as a result of his efforts for the suffering and died on June 21, 1591, at the age of twenty-three, six years short of his ordination as a Jesuit priest.

Even before his time as a Jesuit, Aloysius was known for his love of prayer and fasting. He received his First Communion from St. Charles Borromeo. As a Jesuit at the Roman College, he continued to devote his time to prayer and practices of austerity.  His spiritual director was Robert Bellarmine, who later was canonized and declared a doctor of the church.  When Robert was dying, he asked to be buried next to the grave of Aloysius.  Today, they rest next to each other in the church of St. Ignatius Loyola in Rome.  Pope Benedict XIII canonized Aloysius in 1726, and three years later declared him to be the patron of youth in the Catholic Church, an honor later confirmed by Pope Pius XI in 1926.

 

More on St. Aloysius

FIAT!

Permanent link to this article: https://www.bookofheaven.net/2019/06/21/feast-day-of-st-aloysius-gonzaga-june-21/

Feast Day of Corpus Christi 6/20/19

Traditional Feast of Corpus Christi

 

Corpus Christi in the Divine Will

Permanent link to this article: https://www.bookofheaven.net/2019/06/20/feast-day-of-corpus-christi-6-20-19/

Trinity Sunday – The Most Holy Trinity – Solemnity

FEAST OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY IN THE DIVINE WILL

“Adorable Trinity, hurry, delay no more; 

we pray You, we press You, that Your Will descend upon earth,

make Itself known and Reign on it as It does in Heaven!”  

Fiat!

 

Permanent link to this article: https://www.bookofheaven.net/2019/06/16/trinity-sunday-the-most-holy-trinity-solemnity/

The Feast of Corpus Christi – Novena Starts 6/14

 

Corpus Christi

Novena for the Feast of Corpus Christ can be found here

 

FIAT!

Permanent link to this article: https://www.bookofheaven.net/2019/06/14/the-feast-of-corpus-christi-novena-starts-69/